Author: Nathan Holmes

Controlling Relays with a Raspberry Pi

Ever wanted to control some real world hardware with your Raspberry Pi?  Every now and then, we get questions about using either our I2C-RELAY16 or I2C-XIO boards from the Pi, and it’s been on my eternal backlog list of “I should do a quick article on that…”   So let’s break this logjam and get down […]

3D Printed MRServo Brackets

While I’m still a firm supporter of the tried-and-true industrial foam tape method we’ve sold for MRServo servo switch machine mounting since the beginning, there’s always room for improvement.  Several customers have asked about alternate, mechanical mounting methods, and there’s definitely places that would be useful.  I always have a machine or two that keeps […]

Introducing the CKT-BD1 DCC Block Detector

I’d like to introduce you to ISE’s latest model railroad product – the CKT-BD1 single channel DCC block detector! This little DCC current-based detector is designed to be highly sensitive while being resistant to false triggering, robust, and very easy to install.  All you need to do is pass one of the bus wires to […]

Block Detectors – An Epic Tale

The development of ISE’s block detectors has been a fairly long adventure, so much so that the long, drawn-out development cycle through six or seven iterations has become a bit of a running joke between Michael and myself.  It’s served as a bit of a high water mark in terms of design revisions and major […]

Modelling Time Locks on Switches

Time Locks – An Introduction In the real world, manual switches within signalled territory are protected by devices called “time locks”.  The purpose of these is to prevent a switch from being opened in the face of an approaching train.  When the conductor wants to open the switch, he unlocks it and starts the timer […]

Using Berrett Hill Touch Toggles with MRServo

One of the most interesting electronic parts to come on the market lately is Berrett Hill’s Touch Toggles.  They’re little electronic switches that operate by the proximity of your finger.  There’s no mechanical movement, so you can put them behind acrylic control panel faceplates and other such and still operate them just by touching the […]